I made this sorbet as a test batch before making the fresh Tangerine Sorbet I posted during All Citrus Week.  I wanted to make sure it worked before I juiced all those tangerines.  The beauty of this sorbet is that all you need is one 16 oz bottle of Pom pomegranate juice and some sugar.  Any fruit juice would work, too.  That opens up lots of possibilities when you don’t have fresh fruit around., or you want to make a sorbet out of a fruit that doesn’t juice easily, like pineapple, mango, etc.

Like I said, this was a test batch, so I made the simplest form, with just the juice and sugar.

The transformation is swift and complete.

The result is insanely refreshing.

A lot of ice cream and sorbet recipes call for heating the liquid mixture first.  I didn’t find that necessary, the sugar dissolves just fine into the cold juice, and that makes the whole process even quicker.

Pomegranate Sorbet

2 cups Pom pomegranate juice
2/3 cup sugar

  • Dissolve the sugar into the juice, stirring well until all the sugar crystals have dissolved completely.
  • Pour the juice into a gallon sized zip lock baggie.  Zip it up tight.
  • Put the baggie of juice flat on a baking sheet or platter in the freezer.   Freeze until solid. This will take at least a couple of hours.
  • Cut open the baggie and quickly cut or break the frozen juice into chunks and put into the bowl of a food processor or strong blender. Process until smooth.  You will have to stop to rearrange the chunks of frozen juice a few times.
  • When the sorbet is smooth, spread it in a metal loaf pan.  Cover with foil and put back in the freezer until firmed up.

Notes:  Sorbet always has the best texture a few hours after it is made.  If it gets too hard to scoop, take it out and let it soften a bit before serving.

What juice do you have in your fridge right now?   I bet it would make a great sorbet!

 

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11 Responses to Pomegranate Sorbet

  1. [...] Notes Technique from The View from Great Island. [...]

  2. Amy says:

    I have made the tangerine sorbet twice now. I don’t think I could ever get enough of it. The first time I found Murcotts and they were a little tart so I added some sugar dissolved in water. This time I used honey tangerines and the flavor is more subtle but still really good.

    I’m planning to make both the tangerine and the pomegranate sorbets for our Passover dinner this year.

    Thanks for these great recipes, if you can even call a one ingredient dish a recipe! I love the simplicity of this.

  3. Tricia Buice says:

    Very pretty – perfect for a light snack or formal dessert – looks great!

  4. grace says:

    that’s just the prettiest color ever, and so easy! i like the idea of just buying a bottle of pom and not squeezing the life out of a bunch of pieces of fruit to get at their juices. i guess it’s no secret–i can be SUPER lazy sometimes. :)

  5. The Café Sucré Farine says:

    This is almost too pretty to eat, the pomegranate arils look like jewels!

  6. The color is really so pretty. Come to think of it all your food usually is so fresh and colorful.

  7. phall0106 says:

    I just pinned this to make later. I have a bag of frozen cherries in my freezer that I came across the other night and I’ve been trying to decide how to use them. (I wanted to use them quick, as cherry season is right around the corner and I’ll be freezing new batches.) This sound perfect. Thanks!

  8. annie says:

    Wow! Sue, that’s the first word that comes to mind when I see this! It is so beautiful…and I love to know that you can make sorbet without an ice cream maker! Pinning this!!
    xo
    annie

  9. Mary Younkin says:

    I love how simple these desserts are, Sue. Gorgeous shots as well.

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