Glazed Gingerbread Spritz Cookies

gingerbread spritz cookies in a bowl

Glazed Gingerbread Spritz Cookies are fun to make and have a lovely old world flavor. They may be tiny in size, but they’re bursting with Christmas spirit!

glazed gingerbread spritz cookies on a marble slab

Gingerbread spritz are last minute holiday heroes

As the holiday season progresses and time gets tight, the cookie press makes its annual appearance in our kitchen. Spritz cookies are so fast and easy to make it almost feels like cheating. And talk about volume ~ this recipe makes 100+!

And while some spritz cookies can be a little bland, this gingerbread recipe is nice and zesty with great holiday flavor, just like my original cardamom spritz cookies from last year. In fact, when you compare them to the red and green be-sprinkled spritz, these glazed spiced cookies skew definitely more adult.

gingerbread spritz cookies in a blue patterned bowl

What are spritz (Spritzgebäck) cookies?

  • Spritz cookies are crisp little butter cookies that are a Christmas tradition in Germany and Scandinavian countries.
  • Spritz cookie dough has a soft consistency and is stamped out through a cookie press into fancy shapes, making them super quick and easy. You can stamp out a baking sheet of cookies in no time.
  • The name Spritz comes from the German ‘spritzen’, which means to squirt, and it refers to the way the cookie dough is squeezed through the disks in the cookie press.

You’ll need a cookie press to make these cookies

Maybe your mom had one, maybe you have one stuffed in the back of a cupboard, they’ve been around for generations. Mine is from OXO and it works great. It’s one of those tools you’ll probably only pull out once a year, but you’ll be glad you have it.

glazed gingerbread spritz cookies in a blue and white bowl

One bite gingerbread spritz are small in size but mighty in flavor

These cookies have a simple charm, they’re not fancy or complicated, and one bite tells you all you need to know about why they’ve became almost synonymous with Christmas. It must have something to do with their diminutive size, their festive shapes and buttery flavor, but probably most of all, how darned easy they are to bang out.

glazing gingerbread spritz cookies

Troubleshooting tips for spritz cookie making

Spritz cookies are known for being quick and easy, but can sometimes be tricky. This is because the dough has to be a specific consistency to flow through the small holes of the cookie press, and then hold its shape as it bakes so the pretty designs don’t melt away in the oven. It’s a little bit of a balancing act, so here are some things to keep in mind…

  • My number one tip is to use a recipe specifically formulated for spritz because it needs to have a specific consistency to be ‘spritz-able’ and not spread in the oven. Don’t try to revamp an existing cookie recipe for your cookie press, that’s asking for trouble!
  • The consistency of spritz dough should be soft like play dough. You can adjust by adding a tiny amount of milk.
  • Use unlined, un-greased, cold cookie sheets. I like to put mine in the freezer for a few minutes. This is so that the cookie dough adheres to the surface for easy stamping.
  • You can place your spritzed cookies close together on a cookie sheet because there is little to no spreading when they bake.
  • Test a cookie or two first. If you have trouble with the cookies spreading, pop the cookies in the freezer for 10 minutes before putting them in the oven.

 

glazed gingerbread spritz cookies on a baking rack

The glaze makes these spritz cookies extra special

The glaze can be brushed on with a silicone baking brush, or the cookies can be dunked, head first, into the glaze, which is what I do. It will settle in the nooks and crannies of the cookies and add a welcome hit of sweetness with every gingery bite.

The glaze will dry in about 30 minutes or so, so the cookies can be stacked or bagged for serving or giving. If you like, you can add sprinkles or colored sugars to the glaze while it’s still wet. Note: tiny sprinkles like nonpareils work best on these small cookies.

gingerbread spritz with gift basket

Reader Tip from Amy~

As a ‘do ahead’ trick during the holidays, I mix up the spritz dough, press the cookies onto cookie sheets, then freeze them solid. Once frozen, I put the unbaked cookies into a ziploc bag. When I need the cookies, I put the frozen unbaked cookies on a cookie sheet (can be placed fairly close together because they don’t spread much), then bake. Because they are frozen, it might take an extra minute or two.”

glazed spritz cookies with ribbon

More Christmas cookies to make on repeat

glazed gingerbread spritz cookies on a baking rack
Print
5 from 5 votes

Glazed Gingerbread Spritz Cookies

Glazed Gingerbread Spritz Cookies are fun to make with a lovely old world flavor. They're tiny in size, but bursting with Christmas spirit!
Course Dessert
Cuisine American
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 5 minutes
Yield 100 + cookies
Author Sue Moran

Equipment

  • A spritz cookie press

Ingredients

dry ingredients

  • 3 cups all purpose flour
  • 2 1/2 tsp ground ginger
  • 1 1/2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp nutmeg
  • 1/4 tsp ground cloves
  • 1/4 tsp salt

wet ingredients

  • 1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • 1/2 cup packed brown sugar
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1/2 cup molasses (do not use blackstrap)
  • 1 large egg, at room temperature

glaze

  • 2 cups confectioner's powdered sugar, sifted
  • 2 Tbsp unsalted butter, melted
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 2 Tbsp + 2 teaspoons warm water

Instructions

  • Preheat the oven to 375F
  • Whisk the dry ingredients together to blend well.
    Whisking dry ingredients for gingerbread
  • Cream the butter and sugar until well combined. (I do this in a stand mixer, but you can use hand held beaters.) Add the vanilla, molasses, and egg, and beat until nice and smooth.
  • With the mixer on low, slowly add in the dry ingredients and beat until thoroughly incporporated. You can finish mixing by hand, and don't forget to scrape down the sides and bottom of the bowl to get anything stuck there.
    Gingerbread cookie dough in mixing bowl
  • Cover the dough surface with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 30 minutes. Generally you want spritz dough to be firm enough to hold its shape but soft enough to stamp out easily. In this case the addition of molasses makes the dough extra sticky, so you may need some chilling time. You'll need to do a test cookie or two (or three!) before you get it right.
  • Press your cookies onto cold, ungreased cookie sheets, following the instructions that came with your model. Space them close together since they don't rise or spread. Bake for 5-6 minutes (mine cooked in 5 minutes.) Let them cool on the pan for a couple of minutes before removing to a rack to cool completely. They'll be a little soft at first, but will firm up as they cool.
    spritz cookies pressed onto a cookie sheet
  • Stir the glaze ingredients together until smooth and glossy. You may need to thin it slightly, so have some warm water handy.
    glazing gingerbread spritz cookies on a rack
  • Dip each cookie, face down, into the glaze just until the whole surface makes contact, then lift straight up and let the excess glaze drip off before flipping over and setting back on the rack to dry. If the glaze seems too thick, stir in a very small amount of warm water, and if your glaze seems too thin, add a small amount of sifted powdered sugar.
    glazed gingerbread spritz cookies on a baking rack
  • Let the icing fully dry before moving or stacking the cookies.
    gingerbread spritz cookies in a bowl

Cook's notes

 
  • My number one tip is to use a recipe specifically formulated for spritz because it needs to have a specific consistency to be ‘spritz-able’ and not spread in the oven. Don't try to revamp an existing cookie recipe for your cookie press, that's asking for trouble!
  • The consistency of spritz dough should be soft like play dough. You can adjust by adding a tiny amount of milk.
  • Use unlined, un-greased, cold cookie sheets. I like to put mine in the freezer for a few minutes. This is so that the cookie dough adheres to the surface for easy stamping.
  • You can place your spritzed cookies close together on a cookie sheet because there is little to no spreading when they bake.
  • Test a cookie or two first. If you have trouble with the cookies spreading, pop the cookies in the freezer for 10 minutes before putting them in the oven.
  • Cookie presses vary, so your chilling time, baking time, and yield may also vary.
*recipe adapted from the OXO Test Kitchen
The nutritional information for recipes on this site is provided as a courtesy and although theviewfromgreatisland.com tries to provide accurate nutritional information, these figures are only estimates.

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5 Comments

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    Please rate this recipe!




  • Reply
    Michelle Powell
    December 21, 2020 at 2:07 pm

    5 stars
    I just finished making them and they are perfect! With just enough spice, they aren’t overbearing as most ginger cookies are. Awesome!!!!!

  • Reply
    Thomas Harding
    December 17, 2020 at 1:01 pm

    5 stars
    Sue:
    I made the Mulled Cranberry Jelly this afternoon and as I was standing over a steaming stove I thought, I wonder if i could use the recipe for Mulled Apple Cider Jelly. Would it Work??

  • Reply
    Megan
    December 16, 2020 at 7:22 am

    5 stars
    These look absolutely CHARMING! Even though I just made batches of ginger molasses cookies and spritz cookies for my cookie plates yesterday, I am going to make these today because they look so dang CUTE!

    • Reply
      Sue
      December 16, 2020 at 8:24 am

      Hope you love them Megan, the glaze makes them really pretty and tasty!

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