Baking Brunch bundt cake Cake Citrus Dessert Easter Lemon Mother's Day

Mary Berry’s Lemon Drizzle Cake




This post may contain affiliate links. Please read my disclosure policy.

taking a slice of Mary Berry's Lemon Drizzle Cake

Mary Berry’s Lemon Drizzle Cake is an easy tea cake with a distinctive  crunchy lemon glaze.  You only need a few basic ingredients and 35 minutes to bake this lovely bundt cake. 

removing a slice of lemon bundt cake

How many times can you reinvent the perfect lemon dessert?

Endless times if you ask me.  And good thing, because lemon desserts are the best, and I never want to run out of new ways to indulge.  The unique crunchy glaze on this lemon bundt makes it especially delicious.

lemon drizzle cake, sliced, with lavender flowers

When it comes to cakes of all kinds, I’m all about the texture.  This one has a delicate crumb that stays nice and moist thanks to the glaze.  It acts as a barrier to keep the cake from drying out, so I recommend you don’t slice the cake until you’re ready to serve.

Lemon bundt cake, sliced, with knive

I love to embellish desserts, I admit, but this one doesn’t need anything.

The cake is a lovely golden color, and every time the knife goes through that crunchy lemon glaze it creates a beautiful crackled texture, so there’s no need for any bells and whistles.

If you’re serving it for a special occasions like Easter brunch or a wedding shower you might surround it with simple edible flowers like pansies, or lavender sprigs. You can also place a very small glass or vial into the center of the cake and fill it with delicate flowers for a beautiful effect.

kitchen tool spotlight: a great basic bundt pan


Bundt pans come in all sorts of wonderful shapes and sizes, which is great, except that you never know how your pan is going to work with a specific recipe.  I like to use this one from Wilton which is a basic, all purpose pan that’s sturdy, nonstick, and a standard size, with a 10 cup capacity.

There’s a time and place for intricate shapes, but the streamlined design of this pan will never let you down, and always releases the cake perfectly.

lemon drizzle cake batter in a bundt pan

Pan prep is key to a perfectly released bundt cake

  • always use a nonstick pan
  • butter the pan, making sure to get all the nooks and crannies
  • then add a thin dusting of flour.
  • let the cake cool for 10-15 minutes after baking.
  • run a thin offset spatula or other flexible knife along all the edges to loosen before flipping the pan over to release the cake.

bundt cake on a cooling rack

This cake is on the smaller side as bundts go, but that works well because it’s got the perfect cake to glaze ratio.  The cake has a gentle lemon flavor from the zest in the batter, and the glaze gives it that one two punch from the juice.

Every lemon dessert exploits the flavor of the fruit in a unique way.  My Lemon Layer Cake and Raspberry Lemon Cake feature a super tangy lemon frosting.  My Whole Meyer Lemon Bars and Flourless Whole Meyer Lemon Cake recipes actually use the entire fruit!

removing a slice of lemon bundt cake

How to make your own self-rising flour

Just multiply the basic formula for the amount of flour you need.  I like to make a larger batch just to keep on hand. An airtight container or heavy duty zip lock bag works great for storage.  Blend together:

  • 1 cup flour
  • 1 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 1/4 tsp salt

WANT TO TRY THIS EASY CAKE?

PIN IT TO YOUR FAVORITE BAKING BOARD SO YOU DON’T LOSE IT.

JOIN ME ON PINTEREST FOR MORE CREATIVE RECIPES ~  I LOVE TO PIN 🙂

taking a slice of Mary Berry's Lemon Drizzle Cake
Add to Your Recipe Box
Print
3.7 from 26 votes

Mary Berry's Lemon Drizzle Cake

Mary Berry's Lemon Drizzle Cake is an easy tea cake with a distinctive  crunchy lemon glaze.  You only need a few basic ingredients and 35 minutes to bake this lovely bundt cake. 
Course Dessert
Cuisine American
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 35 minutes
Yield 16 servings

Equipment

  • a standard bundt pan

Ingredients

  • 1 1/8 cup sugar (225 grams)
  • rind of 2 small or 1 large lemon, peeled with a vegetable peeler, yellow part only
  • 1 cup unsalted butter (225 grams) at room temperature
  • 4 extra large eggs, at room temperature
  • 4 Tbsp milk
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 2 1/4 cups self rising flour (275 grams) See below to make your own self rising flour.

crunchy glaze

  • 1 cup granulated sugar (200 grams)
  • juice of 2 lemons

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 350F Grease and flour a standard 9 or 10 cup bundt pan
  • First make the lemon sugar: put the sugar and lemon peels in a food processor and process until the zest is completely incorporated in to the sugar. It will be pale yellow, moist, and fragrant. Note: if you don't have a food processor, the finely grate the zest of two lemons and mix into the sugar by hand.
  • Put the sugar and butter into the bowl of a stand mixer, or you can mix by hand with electric beaters. Cream them together for 4 to 5 minutes, scraping down the bowl as necessary. It should be pale and fluffy. Beat in the eggs, one by one.
  • Blend in the milk, then the baking powder, and finally fold in the flour. Don't over mix, but make sure everything is evenly incorporated.
  • Spoon the batter into your prepared pan and spread out evenly. Bake for 35 minutes, or until risen, golden, and a toothpick inserted near the center comes out without wet batter on it. The top should spring back when lightly touched.
  • Let the cake cool for 12 minutes, then run a thin offset spreading knife around the edges to gently loosen them. Loosen the cake around the center neck of the pan, soo. Gently flip the cake over onto a cooling rack.
  • Meanwhile, mix the sugar with enough lemon juice to make a loose paste, about the consistency of a runny honey. Brush the glaze liberally over the entire surface of the cake (while it is still warm!) going over it more than once if necessary. You'll want a thick even coating. Let the icing dry before slicing.

Notes

How to make your own self-rising flour

Just multiply the basic formula for the amount of flour you need.  I like to make a larger batch to keep on hand.
  • 1 cup flour
  • 1 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 1/4 tsp salt
*Lemon Drizzle Cake recipe slightly adapted from Mary Berry

lemon drizzle cake pin

 

email sign up prompt

You Might Also Like

13 Comments

    Leave a Reply






  • Reply
    Southerner Forever
    April 19, 2020 at 5:15 pm

    Because the amount of juice in lemons can vary so much, how much juice do you recommend for the drizzle?

    • Reply
      Sue
      April 19, 2020 at 5:32 pm

      I would add a little at a time until the sugar becomes a thick but spoonable glaze, like thick honey. You might not need all the juice, so start with one lemon and go from there. If you’re using bottled lemon juice, start with a tablespoon and go up from there.

  • Reply
    Debi Doolittle
    April 17, 2020 at 9:24 pm

    5 stars
    Just made this tonight and it was delicious! Took some to our neighbors and they loved it! My glaze didn’t come out as “crunchy” as you described but I sprinkled confectioners sugar over the top and it looked nice! I will make again for sure!

  • Reply
    Carol B
    April 17, 2020 at 5:08 pm

    I have lots of fresh organic blueberries on hand. Would it work to fold them in to the batter immediately prior to baking? I’m a fan of the flavor combination in general, but not sure what you thought about using them in this particular recipe ….

    • Reply
      Sue
      April 17, 2020 at 8:24 pm

      I think that would be really nice Carol…the batter is thick enough to support the berries, for sure.

    • Reply
      Mary Ann | The Beach House Kitchen
      April 20, 2020 at 5:55 pm

      5 stars
      I always say you can’t beat a bundt! And lemony desserts are always at the top of my list too. I’ll be adding this to my baking list Sue!

  • Reply
    2sisters recipes
    April 17, 2020 at 2:10 pm

    Sue, your lemon cakes are all winners!! Thanks for the recipe!

  • Reply
    Laurie
    April 17, 2020 at 11:36 am

    Sorry … I misread the recipe and do see a bundt size. My pan probably won’t work, so I’m what other type of pan might this recipe work? Thanks.

    • Reply
      Sue
      April 17, 2020 at 12:18 pm

      Your pan should work fine, Laurie, the batter just won’t come up very high. And I believe Mary makes this in a 9×12 pan, so that would work for sure.

  • Reply
    Laurie
    April 17, 2020 at 11:33 am

    I just baked the lemon yogurt loaf cake … again … from Odette Williams’ Simple Cake yesterday! We love lemon in our house and a good bundt. Is the glaze crunchy from the granulated sugar? Also, what size bundt? You indicated it was small, but the recipe lists no size. Mine is a 10-15 cup bundt. If that’s too big, I’ve got lots of other round, square and loaf pans. What size[s] might work?

  • Reply
    Amanda Marie
    April 17, 2020 at 8:04 am

    5 stars
    Oh I love Mary Berry. I use her Hot Cross Bun recipe every Easter – even last week although I had to use dried cranberries instead of raisins as I had plenty and shopping is challenging right now. I’m from England and several family members can’t find flour or eggs. But I love it when Mary says, “It’s a bit of a palaver!” which about sums up life at the moment. Will be making this cake soon.

  • Reply
    JUDY FORNEY
    April 17, 2020 at 7:35 am

    I couldn’t get fresh lemons from the grocery. Can I use lemon juice>?

    • Reply
      Sue
      April 17, 2020 at 7:37 am

      You can in a pinch, but you won’t have the zest, which is so important to the flavor. Might be worth a try, though, we all have to make compromises these days 🙂