Maple Pecan Pound Cake

maple pecan pound cake, sliced

Maple Pecan Pound Cake is the ultimate fall quick bread, with layers and layers of rich, caramelized flavor from browned butter, maple syrup, toasted pecans, and brown sugar.

maple pecan pound cake glazed with chopped pecans

maple pecan pound cake doubles down on toasty fall flavors

You know when a recipe sounds so good, and you just know you’re going to love it? Well, I promise you that if you love the sound of maple pecan poundcake, this recipe will not disappoint. Why? Because I made sure to layer in a supporting cast of rich, caramel-y flavors every chance I could in this recipe, giving it a full-bodied deliciousness that lingers on the palate and will have you going back for sliver after sliver all day long. This cake is perfect for the season, we love it!

a slice of maple pecan pound cake, with nuts and spoon

simple ingredients work together to make an unforgettable maple pecan pound cake

  • browned butter, a simple step that brings a distinctive nutty flavor note to the party. (Check out the video below to see how it’s done.)
  • maple syrup is a complex flavor layered into the batter and the glaze.
  • brown sugar adds moistness and caramel notes to support the maple syrup.
  • 3 eggs enrich the batter, adding color, height, and flavor to our pound cake.
  • vanilla extract and a touch of maple extract bring out the other flavors.
  • milk (I used almond milk because it was what I had on hand, but feel free to use dairy milk or a non dairy milk of your choice.)
  • salt helps all the other flavors shine.
  • baking powder is essential for helping the cake rise. Make sure yours is fresh, and it’s definitely worth replacing if you’re not sure.
  • flour, I use all purpose. You can use cake flour, which contains a bit of cornstarch to lighten the texture.
  • pecans, toasting them lightly in the oven brings out their flavor and crunch!
maple pecan pound cake glazed and sliced, on parchment paper

what is maple extract and do I really need it?

  • Maple extract is a flavoring agent made from maple syrup, without without artificial flavors, dyes or corn syrup. It imparts a more intense maple flavor to baked goods than you can achieve with maple syrup or maple sugar alone.
  • Maple extract plays a big part in bringing out that elusive maple flavor in this cake, and while you can definitely make this recipe without it, I recommend picking up a bottle next time you’re at the grocery store. Look for pure maple extract as opposed to artificial flavorings. As with almond extract, a little goes a long way. Half a teaspoon is usually good for quick breads, muffins, and frostings, etc. It may take some trial and error to find a brand you like.
  • You can find maple extract in specialty stores, but I find McCormick brand in my supermarket, and I am happy with the flavor. I never start a fall baking season without it.
a loaf of maple pecan pound cake, sliced

a pound cake is a super versatile recipe

A loaf cake like this is hard to categorize… is it a breakfast bread? A tea time snack? Dessert? This one is a bit of all three, and that’s the beauty of a great pound cake. I think it would be fantastic to bake if you have houseguests this fall, or have a friend or neighbor who could use a little extra love right now. If you’re back at the office these days, this is the perfect treat to bring in for the gang.

a slice of maple pecan pound cake on parchment paper

why this pound cake works

You have lots of choices for fall baking, that’s for sure. But if I have to choose one star ingredient/flavor for the season it would be maple. Maple is one of those incredibly complex flavors ~ it’s up there with fine wines, cheeses, and chocolates. But whether you’re a maple syrup connoisseur or not, you’ll appreciate the rich, warm notes in this cake. It’s a keeper!

A slice of maple pecan pound cake, with bite taken

fall quick breads and loaf cakes

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5 from 6 votes

Maple Pecan Pound Cake

Maple Pecan Pound Cake is the ultimate fall quick bread, with layers and layers of rich, caramelized flavor from browned butter, maple syrup, toasted pecans, and brown sugar.
Course Dessert
Cuisine American
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour
Total Time 1 hour 20 minutes
Yield 10 servings
Calories 458kcal
Author Sue Moran

Equipment

  • standard 9×5 loaf pan

Ingredients

  • 1 cup unsalted butter, browned and slightly cooled Note: see video for instructions on how to make browned butter)
  • 3/4 cup brown sugar, lightly packed (I used light brown sugar, but you can also use dark brown.)
  • 1/4 cup maple syrup
  • 3 large eggs
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1/2 tsp maple extract
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 1 3/4 cup all purpose flour
  • 1 cup chopped pecans, lightly toasted Note: toast pecans on a dry baking sheet in a 350F oven for 10-15 minutes until fragrant.)

for the glaze

  • 2/3 cup powdered sugar
  • 3 tsp water
  • 2 tsp maple syrup
  • small pinch salt
  • handful of chopped toasted pecans to top (optional)

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 350F and butter a 9×5 loaf pan. I lined mine with parchment paper for easy removal, as well.
  • In a mixing bowl, combine the browned butter, brown sugar, maple syrup, eggs, vanilla and maple extracts, milk, and salt. Whisk everything together well.
  • Add the baking powder and whisk again to distribute it thoroughly.
  • Fold in the flour, and finally fold in the chopped pecans.
  • Pour the batter into your prepared loaf pan and bake for about 55-65 minutes, until risen and a toothpick inserted into the center of the cake comes out without wet batter clinging to it.
  • Allow the loaf cake to cool for 15 minutes before removing from the pan to a cooling rack. Let cool thoroughly before glazing.
  • To make the glaze, whisk together the powdered sugar, water, maple syrup, and salt, until smooth. This is a relatively thin consistency, which makes a crackly, translucent glaze. You can use less water for a thicker glaze.
  • Pour or brush the glaze over the cooled cake, and follow quickly with a handful of chopped pecans scattered on top.
  • Allow the glaze to harden before slicing.

Nutrition

Calories: 458kcal | Carbohydrates: 50g | Protein: 5g | Fat: 27g | Saturated Fat: 13g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 3g | Monounsaturated Fat: 9g | Trans Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 99mg | Sodium: 309mg | Potassium: 208mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 31g | Vitamin A: 664IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 87mg | Iron: 2mg
The nutritional information for recipes on this site is provided as a courtesy and although theviewfromgreatisland.com tries to provide accurate nutritional information, these figures are only estimates.
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9 Comments

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    Please rate this recipe!




  • Reply
    Sallie Doeg
    October 5, 2021 at 2:11 pm

    5 stars
    Can you double this recipe?
    I love having an extra loaf in the freezer.

    • Reply
      Sue Moran
      October 5, 2021 at 2:25 pm

      Yes, that will work fine.

      • Reply
        Sallie Doeg
        October 6, 2021 at 3:32 pm

        Thanks!!

  • Reply
    Pamela H Miller
    September 17, 2021 at 5:22 pm

    5 stars
    Looks absolutely delicious, I love different bread recipes.

  • Reply
    Donna Vaughn
    September 17, 2021 at 2:00 pm

    This looks delicious! Can’t wait to try it!

  • Reply
    Barb Lund
    September 17, 2021 at 8:58 am

    I was not able to find your video for browning butter.

    • Reply
      CinB
      September 18, 2021 at 1:27 pm

      I found the video but it didn’t include directions or any specifics?

      • Reply
        Sue Moran
        September 18, 2021 at 2:13 pm

        Browning butter is really pretty simple, you melt your butter in a skillet, and then keep heating it, swirling or stirring the butter almost constantly, until you start to see it brown. You’ll see little specks of brown appear, which are the milk solids in the butter. You can stop heating when it turns golden brown, or keep heating until it reaches a deep nutty brown, but you need to be careful not to let it burn or, of course, it becomes bitter. Once you do it for the first time you’ll find it an easy proceedure.

    • Reply
      Angie Moseley
      October 5, 2021 at 8:40 am

      Browning butter is really pretty simple, you melt your butter in a skillet, and then keep heating it, swirling or stirring the butter almost constantly, until you start to see it brown. You’ll see little specks of brown appear, which are the milk solids in the butter. You can stop heating when it turns golden brown, or keep heating until it reaches a deep nutty brown, but you need to be careful not to let it burn or, of course, it becomes bitter. Once you do it for the first time you’ll find it an easy procedure.

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