Instant Pot Clotted Cream Recipe




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Instant Pot Clotted Cream on a scone

My Instant Pot Clotted Cream Recipe is a revelation, plain and simple.  Who’d a thunk you could use your Instant Pot to create the famously decadent spreadable cream that’s the highlight of a classic British afternoon tea?  I’ll show you how to make it easily in your own kitchen.

Instant Pot Clotted Cream in a small glass jar

What if I don’t have an Instant Pot?

That recipe that has been a long time favorite on the blog.  I think it’s been so popular because it sets out an easy method for making a very special, exotic treat that most of us don’t have access to.  If you’ve ever had clotted cream on a scone in Britain, or at an afternoon tea, you’ll know how uniquely delicious this thick creamy spread can be.  If you haven’t experienced clotted cream, I suggest you stick around…

What the heck is clotted cream?

Fair question, it isn’t the most common thing in the world…

  • Clotted cream is a thick creamy spread normally used on scones, and popular in Great Britain.
  • It’s made from heavy cream that has been heated over a period of time until it thickens or ‘clots’ into a spreadable consistency with a unique cooked cream flavor.
  • Clotted cream is world famous for its unparalleled rich texture, and it’s an essential part of a classic British afternoon tea, where it’s spread on scones and topped with jam.
  • Normally the only way to get clotted cream is to visit Great Britain, or to spend big $$ on a very small imported jar at your local gourmet market.

What does clotted cream taste like?

  • Clotted cream has a very simple flavor profile, like an unsweetened heavy cream with a subtle ‘cooked’ flavor.  The texture is equally if not more important than the flavor, it’s somewhere between a very thick whipped cream, and butter.

A small pot of Instant Pot Clotted Cream with almond cream scones

Clotted cream is an exotic treat, you might be able to find small imported jars in your better supermarkets, but you will pay a premium price for it.  I developed a way to make your own homemade clotted cream in your oven, which I’ve shared in my original post, here.

Today I’m unveiling another, even easier method for making homemade clotted cream, right in your Instant Pot  (see, I told you you should get one.)

The Instant Pot method is similar to the oven method, but takes a lot of the guess work out of the process.  For those of you who don’t have an oven that can be set precisely to 180F, this is an great alternative method, and just in time for Mother’s Day, Easter, Passover, and spring entertaining!  For either method you’ll need the same thing: non- ultra pasteurized heavy cream, 2 pints.

What does ultra pasteurized mean?

  • All milk and cream sold in the US is pasteurized, meaning it’s heated in order to kill harmful bacteria and to help preserve it longer.
  • Ultra pasteurized cream is simply heated to a higher temperature, at least 280F, and that kills even more of the bacteria and helps it stay fresher for even longer (before opening.)

Where to find non-ultra-pasteurized cream ~

  • Most heavy cream sold today is what’s called ‘ultra-pastuerized’.  That just means it’s been heated beyond the regular pasteurizing method so that it has an extra long shelf life.  This can interfere with the clotting process, so the general rule it to use regular pasteurized cream when trying to make clotted cream.
  • I have found non-ultra-pasteurized cream at Whole Foods and Trader Joes, for starters.
  • Look for cream with a high fat content, mine is 40%.

Instant Pot Clotted Cream with a currant scones

While the cream is clotting, you’ve got time for a quick batch of scones!  I’ll share my currant almond scones on the blog next week, but in the meantime, I’ve got lots of scone recipes on the blog for you to try.  Clotted cream and scones is one of those combinations that is unique and can’t be duplicated.  But luckily you can make them both in your own kitchen :)

And trust me, there is nothing, and I mean nothing, like a warm homemade scone spread with homemade clotted cream.

Instant Pot Clotted Cream spread on a scone

TIPS for making Instant Pot Clotted Cream ~

  • This is a simple but precise process.  Stick to the recipe as stated, this recipe doesn’t have much room for variation.
  • You can try this with regular pasteurized cream, but at your own risk.
  • Make sure you refrigerate the cream as per the recipe after you’ve cooked it in the Instant Pot, and before you disturb it, the cream thickens up further as it chills in the fridge.
  • AFTER you’ve chilled the cream for at least 12 hours, or even longer, you can skim off the thick cream and put it into a jar.  There will be leftover liquid in the pot, and you can use that to make scones.
  • You can stir some of the thinner liquid into your clotted cream if you want a looser consistency.
  • If your clotted cream seems very thin, or you mistakenly mixed too much of the thin liquid into it, try blending it very briefly with an immersion blender, this works like a charm.  Just be sure not to blend it too much or you’ll get clotted butter.  Also good ;)  but not what we’re going for.

Why is there a crust on my clotted cream?

  • Worry not ~ the crust is a characteristic of clotted cream, it can be creamy white or even darker yellow.  That signifies that the cream has cooked, and ‘clotted’ or clumped into an unbelievably delicious spread.  The clotted cream underneath the crust will be creamier.

tvfgi recommends: 6 Quart Instant Pot on Amazon Prime


I used my 6 quart Instant Pot for this recipe, and I like it because the size is not too big or too small for most recipes.  It’s currently under $100 on Amazon Prime and well worth it.


Reader Rave ~

“I just made the clotted cream in my 8Qt Duo multi-cooker. I used 5 C cream, which came 1 inch up the inside of the pot. I cooked it for 8 hours on warm and put it in the fridge overnight. AMAZING! I got about 2.5 C clotted cream and about the same amount in liquid (which has already been made into scones).”  ~Kim


Instant Pot Clotted Cream Recipe
Rate this recipe
28 ratings

Prep Time: 12 hours

Cook Time: 8 hours

Category: breakfast, tea

Cuisine: British

Yield: makes 1 pint

Instant Pot Clotted Cream spread on a scone

Instant Pot Clotted Cream Recipe ~ how to make authentic homemade clotted cream in the Instant Pot ~ spread on scones, it's a British tea time tradition!

Ingredients

  • 2 pints of non-ultra pasteurized heavy cream, make sure to find non-ultra pasteurized cream for this

Instructions

  1. Note: I like to plan to start my Instant Pot clotted cream in the morning, when I wake up. That way I can put it in the refrigerator before I go to bed and wake up to a finished product!
  2. Pour the cream directly into the Instant Pot. Close the lid (no need to set the vent, we're not pressure cooking.) Press the YOGURT button and press until it says BOIL.
  3. When the machine beeps, and has reached the boil stage, press the KEEP WARM button and let it go for 8-10 hours. I let mine go for 10 hours.
  4. Turn the machine off and remove the pot. Let cool at room temperature without disturbing. Then refrigerate the pot, as is, for 12 hours.
  5. Carefully scoop off the thickened layer of clotted cream, leaving the thin liquid behind. It's ok if you get some of the thinner liquid into your clotted cream, you can mix it in.
  6. Spoon your cream into a glass jar. You can leave as is, or stir it together to make it creamier.
  7. Enjoy within 2 weeks.
  8. The leftover liquid can be used to make scones.

Notes

If you don't have an Instant Pot, see my original post on How To Make Homemade Clotted Cream in an oven.

Note: If you’ve got any leftover clotted cream, be sure to check out my Clotted Cream Shortbread!

 

Thanks for pinning!

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83 Comments

  • Reply
    Rachel
    July 3, 2019 at 7:04 am

    Hi Sue! I’m having a large tea party and will be making around 40-50 scones. How much cream should I start out with? If I double this recipe should I have enough? Thank you!

    • Reply
      Sue
      July 3, 2019 at 7:50 am

      I think you’d be smart to make three batches, and definitely make them separately Rachel, this is not an easy to thing to tweak.

  • Reply
    M
    June 25, 2019 at 5:49 pm

    How would you recommend using the whey to make scones? 1:1 replacement for the cream in a cream scone recipe? Or pick a recipe that uses butter?

    • Reply
      Sue
      June 25, 2019 at 7:52 pm

      You could use it in place of cream or buttermilk in a scone recipe, I’ve done that. Most recipes use butter and also cream or buttermilk, so you’d replace the liquid in the recipe with the whey.

  • Reply
    Nicole Fischer
    June 20, 2019 at 11:03 am

    I don’t have the yogurt making instapot. What settings can I use?

    • Reply
      Sue
      June 20, 2019 at 1:06 pm

      I haven’t tried to do this in any other Instant Pot Nicole, so I don’t know if you can. Maybe a reader will chime in here…

  • Reply
    Cheryl Bohn
    June 8, 2019 at 4:08 pm

    I’m wondering, how long does one recipe “keep” in the fridge?

    • Reply
      Sue
      June 8, 2019 at 5:32 pm

      It should keep, air tight, for a few weeks, Cheryl.

  • Reply
    Denise maccaull
    June 8, 2019 at 6:00 am

    My instant pot does not have a yogurt setting- is there another setting to use instead . I have 8 quart iplux

    • Reply
      Sue
      June 8, 2019 at 8:19 am

      I’m sorry I’m not familiar with that model Denise, maybe search google for the answer. If you have a custom keep warm setting that can be set to a certain temperature, that might work.

  • Reply
    JL
    June 5, 2019 at 3:14 am

    Thank you for posting this! Im thrilled to try! I actually just put the cream in my Instant Pot Ultra right now!

    I have a couple of questions: I have an option to “Keep Warm” at different temperatures (high, low, custom). Do you have a recommendation on how I should set this? Also, the screen on my instant pot said “Yogurt” after beeping a few times after the “Boil” function. Was this an indicator that the Instant Pot has reached boiling? This is my first time using the Yogurt function. Thanks in advance for your guidance!

    • Reply
      Sue
      June 5, 2019 at 6:32 am

      I don’t have the Ultra, so it’s going to be a guess here, but I would see if you can set the “keep warm” to 180F. And yes, if your pot beeps after the boil function, that means it’s gotten to the boil.

      • Reply
        JL
        June 5, 2019 at 7:25 pm

        Thanks so much Sue! I did exactly that – set the temp to 180F. I came home today to a dark yellow crust. Put it in the fridge. I hope it turns out! I’ll update when it’s all done. What a treat!

        • Reply
          JL
          June 7, 2019 at 3:08 am

          Turned out so, so well! Thanks again, Sue! Will be making this again for sure!

          • Sue
            June 7, 2019 at 7:10 am

            Enjoy :)

  • Reply
    Esther
    June 5, 2019 at 12:25 am

    Hi, as an Instant Pot newbie, I’m noticing that no one ever tells you when the pot is ready, what beeps to ignore and which ones indicate it’s ready etc. I’ve had to search and search to find out when this ‘boil’ stage is done and all I could find was a comment that said it’s when the display says ‘yogt’. I stopped my IP at this stage and went straight into keep warm but it doesn’t look right after 8 hours in the fridge. How long is it supposed to boil for? Should I have stopped it at the ‘yogt’ message? Why don’t any of the recipes tell me this? Sorry, I’m just not loving my IP at all as the recipes all seem geared towards people who know what they’re doing.

  • Reply
    Ellen Massaro
    May 30, 2019 at 2:24 pm

    Have you tried making it directly in small canning jars, like those you can buy? Wondering if timing would change with a water bath….

  • Reply
    Margie
    May 29, 2019 at 8:04 pm

    Sue – thank you! I am so looking forward to making clotted cream. I have, probably a newbie question, about the Instant Pot. I pushed the yogurt button and kept pushing it to say Boil, which is did. It beeped three times within less than a minute. Was that the beep I’m waiting for? Or will it take some time for it to get to the boil level and then beep once? Thanks for helping a new to Instant Pot and first time clotted cream maker!

    • Reply
      Sue
      May 29, 2019 at 8:22 pm

      No, it will take the machine a while to get to the boil, so the initial beeps you heard were just the machine starting up.

      • Reply
        Margie
        May 29, 2019 at 8:44 pm

        Sue, thank you for responding so quickly! I had just started making the clotted cream. I’ve started over (I was five minutes into my 10 hours on Warm). This will be a great learning experience – both with my new IP and making clotted cream. Excited!

      • Reply
        Margie
        May 30, 2019 at 9:23 pm

        What fun this has been for the whole family… clotted cream, who knew! We all worked together and made scones as well. I have two questions: I have an 8 qt. IP. To get 2″ of liquids, I need four pints of cream, which is fine. I am just wondering if It has to be 2″ deep or is there a min/max range. Also, once the cream has sat in the fridge for 12 hours, and I put the finished cream in the pint jar overnight, if I find that it is too thick next day, could I still add some of the liquid whey to thin it out a bit, or did I miss my window? Thanks so much for the recipe. Wow, what an adventure you have taken us all on! Such fun.

      • Reply
        Margie
        June 9, 2019 at 9:46 pm

        Thank you for this recipe… loving how easy it is! Just finished my second batch of clotted cream. We have to call it British Butter so my husband will eat it… ;-) Since I have an 8 qt. IP should my goal be to have at least 2″ of heavy cream in the pot, or just a 1-3″ range? Thanks again.

        • Reply
          Sue
          June 10, 2019 at 7:04 am

          I love your clever trick to get your husband to eat this, it made me laugh! I haven’t made this in an 8 qt, but I think I would aim for at least 2″ depth. If you have the time it would be so useful if you come back and report on your experience with the 8qt.

          • Margie
            June 13, 2019 at 7:43 pm

            Haha! Years of easing him into trying things… Lemon Curd is the latest thing I’m trying to market to him! Thanks for the information. I will try it this weekend and let you know. We are loving it. :-)

  • Reply
    Betsy Anderson
    May 27, 2019 at 5:34 am

    Hi
    I was excited to try this recipe in the Instant Pot. I have tried on several occasions to make clotted cream and all I get is the top “crust” with 2 cups of cream below. I search out for pasteurized cream and use it. This time I bought raw milk for a nearby farm and skimmed the cream off the top. I tried to keep the milk out. I didn’t see a milk line in the cream. looked to be all cream and I did have some cream left in the milk. Another botched batch. Just the crust and lots of liquid. What could I have done wrong? HELP. I would love to get this right.

    • Reply
      Sue
      May 27, 2019 at 8:40 am

      Hey Betsey ~ when you finish ‘cooking’ the cream, are you putting it in the refrigerator overnight? The chilling thickens up the clotted cream considerably. And many people consider the crust to be the best part! I’m not sure about your farm milk, it’s hard to know what went wrong there since there are so many variables.

  • Reply
    Tina Muldoon
    May 25, 2019 at 6:41 pm

    I’m so excited about this recipe. I am just confused with the Keep Warm. There are three choices: low, normal and more. I’ve chosen more because I’ve made clotted cream in the oven and it’s set at 180? as you’ve stated as well. I hope I did the right thing!

    • Reply
      Sue
      May 25, 2019 at 8:19 pm

      Hi Tina ~ my keep warm button has no choices, just one setting. Are you sure you’re pressing the keep warm button? What model Instant Pot do you have?

  • Reply
    Toni Juarez
    May 11, 2019 at 9:55 am

    Does the instant pot boiling point get to 212? And does it lower to 180 in the keep warm setting?

  • Reply
    Laura Clark
    May 8, 2019 at 7:28 am

    I wonder if you could do this using a sous vide – I can set the temperature to 180′. Could I make it in individual jelly jars?

    • Reply
      Sue
      May 8, 2019 at 7:56 am

      I have no idea about the sous vide, interesting! You can’t really make it in individual jars because the clotted cream separates from the whey, and you need to scrape off the clotted cream and then jar it.

  • Reply
    Kim
    April 29, 2019 at 2:10 pm

    I just made the clotted cream in my 8Qt Duo multi-cooker. I used 5 C cream, which came 1 inch up the inside of the pot. I cooked it for 8 hours on warm and put it in the fridge overnight. AMAZING! I got about 2.5 C clotted cream and about the same amount in liquid (which has already been made into scones).

    The question I have is: would cooking the cream for 10 hours have resulted in more clotted cream and less liquid? Or, would I have had more of the yellow “crust” on top?

    Thanks for the great recipe!

    • Reply
      Sue
      April 29, 2019 at 3:18 pm

      I think you might get a little more clotting if you leave it longer, Kim, and keep in mind, that crust is considered gold by clotted cream aficionados!

    • Reply
      JL
      June 5, 2019 at 3:22 am

      Hi Kim! Do you remember if you put the warm setting on low, med, high, or custom? I have an 8qt Ultra as well and just put it on. Thanks in advance!

  • Reply
    Jean
    April 29, 2019 at 12:30 pm

    Can I use raw cream to make clotted cream? My Whole Foods and Trader Joes sources for non-ultra pasteurized cream have dried up. They just quit carrying it.

    • Reply
      Sue
      April 29, 2019 at 12:39 pm

      Oh wow, that’s unfortunate. I believe the original way to make clotted cream is with raw cream Jean, so I imagine that would work if you have a good source. I can’t say for sure, though, because I haven’t personally tried it.

  • Reply
    Nita
    April 13, 2019 at 3:46 am

    I was excited to try the recipe until I realized it was for an IP with the yogurt function. Unfortunately, my Lux doesn’t have that, so I need to figure out how to do it in the IP without the yogurt button.

    Your Almomd Scones look divine! I searched for the recipe & didn’t find it.

  • Reply
    Sydney
    April 11, 2019 at 2:11 pm

    Hi! I would love some help here understanding this method of Insta pot use. I poured in the cream, selected “yogurt” and then pressed it again to get it on the “boil” setting. Once it beeped, I tried pressing the keep warm button. It didn’t automatically switch over, so I canceled the boil and then just switched it to keep warm. Is this what I was supposed to do?

    • Reply
      Sue
      April 11, 2019 at 2:37 pm

      Yes, that’s what I did.

  • Reply
    Debra
    April 11, 2019 at 6:21 am

    Do you think a 3 quart mini instant pot is too small for this recipe?

    • Reply
      Sue
      April 11, 2019 at 7:02 am

      I think it might be Debra, because the cream would be very deep. You could try it with one pint of cream.

  • Reply
    aimee
    April 10, 2019 at 10:40 am

    Do you cover this when you refrigerate it overnight? I just had an amazing Victoria sponge and now I need clotted cream in my life. I’d given in to just using jam on scones…

    • Reply
      Sue
      April 10, 2019 at 10:47 am

      I cover it, yes, but you don’t have to.

  • Reply
    Kathy
    April 10, 2019 at 7:33 am

    What can I do if my IP doesn’t have a yogurt setting?

    • Reply
      Sue
      April 10, 2019 at 7:43 am

      I think you might try the oven method, Kathy, I link to that in the post. If your oven can be set to 180F, that will work.

  • Reply
    Ken Roberts
    April 6, 2019 at 10:28 am

    I’ve done this twice now with Kroger ultra pasteurised heavy whipping cream and got excellent results.

    • Reply
      Sue
      April 6, 2019 at 10:54 am

      Thanks for that Ken, I’ve actually made it once myself with non-ultra pasteurized, but it’s hit or miss for me. Maybe I’ll do a new set of tests on that.

  • Reply
    Ulises
    March 17, 2019 at 5:37 pm

    So, Do you think a slow cooker can do the Job over night ?

    • Reply
      Sue
      March 17, 2019 at 7:00 pm

      The slow cooker is too hot for this Ulises.

  • Reply
    Carla
    March 12, 2019 at 4:57 am

    Can I make this in my pressure cooker, as I don’t have your cooker
    Thank you

    • Reply
      Sue
      March 12, 2019 at 1:01 pm

      Unfortunately no, Carla, because this isn’t actually pressure cooked, it’s just using the yogurt function of the Instant Pot to keep the cream at a constant 180F for the 10 hours. Sorry!

  • Reply
    Carole
    March 11, 2019 at 9:27 pm

    Another method to make clotted cream is in the oven. Using non ultra-pasteurized whipping cream, pour a quart or so into a glass baking dish. Put in a 170° oven overnight. In the morning, the dish and warm cream goes into the fridge to cool. After it has cooled, scrape off the “clotted” cream and put it in a jar. I use the watery whey to make scones or soup. This method results in caramely, buttery flecks in the cream. You can homogenize the mixture by beating by hand or with an electric mixer. It is incredibly delicious.

  • Reply
    Katerina @ diethood .com
    March 10, 2019 at 9:04 am

    This is fantastic!! I LOVE that I can make it in the Instant Pot! Can’t wait to try it!

  • Reply
    Lucy
    March 9, 2019 at 8:05 am

    Do you think that the yogurt button set for 10 hours would work? Then it would turn itself off–more foolproof! This looks fabulous!

    • Reply
      Sue
      March 9, 2019 at 8:39 am

      I think the yogurt setting would be more like 110-115F which is the temp to ferment yogurt, so too low.

  • Reply
    LIsa
    March 9, 2019 at 5:55 am

    I have studied so many recipes on making clotted cream. Looks like I’m getting me an IP ASAP!
    I cant wait to try this. Thank you!!

    • Reply
      Sue
      March 9, 2019 at 7:36 am

      I think you’ll love this Lisa, the only problem is thinking up enough ways to eat all that clotted cream ;)

  • Reply
    Diane Kindall
    March 8, 2019 at 6:08 pm

    Just wondering what size IP you are using for the clotted cream. I have a 4 quart and an 8 quart. I know the most popular size is 6 quarts so I’m wondering if I should only use 1 pt of cream for the 4 quart or 3 pots for the 8 quart. What do you think?

    • Reply
      Sue
      March 8, 2019 at 6:21 pm

      I did use my 6 quart, I’ll make sure to mention that in the post, Diane. I’m not exactly sure what you should do, but as long as the cream comes up at least 2 inches in the pot, you should be ok, so you might see how much cream that would be in your 4 qt.

  • Reply
    Alice
    March 8, 2019 at 4:27 pm

    Can hardly wait to try this recipe. Thank you for sharing

  • Reply
    Mary
    March 8, 2019 at 12:08 pm

    Looks like I’m just going to have to have to get myself an Instant Pot. Couldn’t trust such a precious commodity to my cranky oven!!! I used to enjoy clotted cream when living in the UK. Could have it sent from Cornwall in little pots which used to have the crust on the top. I always imagined they had set it in these pots when making it?? I wonder how?

    Thanks for the impetus to buy an IP!!!

    • Reply
      Sue
      March 8, 2019 at 1:37 pm

      Cornwall is famous for its cream and I think it’s actually higher in fat than other creams, so it’s possible, I guess, that they can make it right in those little jars… don’t know!

  • Reply
    Jessica Formicola
    March 8, 2019 at 10:19 am

    This is going onto my Instant Pot line up! I can’t wait to try it!

    • Reply
      Sue
      March 8, 2019 at 10:25 am

      My IP lineup keeps growing and growing…

  • Reply
    Ilona
    March 8, 2019 at 10:03 am

    I can’t believe how many things you can make in Instant Pot. I don’t have it yet, maybe someday.

    • Reply
      Sue
      March 8, 2019 at 10:25 am

      It’s going to become a kitchen necessity Ilona, I’m convinced.

  • Reply
    Maria
    March 8, 2019 at 9:19 am

    omg.omg.omg. we were just at a friend’s home for homemade fondue dinner last night and were discussing clotted cream! i’ll be heading to Trader Joes today! thanks for the recipe!

    • Reply
      Sue
      March 8, 2019 at 10:25 am

      Perfect!

      • Reply
        MARIA
        March 10, 2019 at 10:35 am

        Success! I used my 8 qt IP and think the 6 qt or smaller would be easier. Thanks for the awesome recipe.

        • Reply
          Sue
          March 10, 2019 at 11:27 am

          Congrats, now all you need are the scones ;)

  • Reply
    Natalie
    March 8, 2019 at 9:01 am

    I never tasted clotted cream before (I don’t believe we have anything like that where I live), but it sounds and looks quite interesting for cooking and baking.

    • Reply
      Sue
      March 8, 2019 at 9:12 am

      Trying completely new and interesting foods is one of the great pleasures in life!

  • Reply
    Jacqueline Debono
    March 8, 2019 at 8:44 am

    I adore a British cream tea with scones, jam and clotted cream! But, have only ever had it in those little tea shops they have near Windsor Castle or other British tourist destinations! Now I can make my own! So cool that clotted cream can be made in an Instant Pot, so yes! Now I have to get one!

    • Reply
      Sue
      March 8, 2019 at 8:47 am

      In the meantime until you get an IP try the oven method :)

  • Reply
    Barbara
    March 8, 2019 at 8:07 am

    Love, Love your posts – I was wondering for those of us who don’t have an instant pot, how can we use the
    crockpot?

    • Reply
      Sue
      March 8, 2019 at 8:09 am

      You can use your oven, Barbara, if you can set it to 180F. The crock pot doesn’t work because even on the keep warm setting it gets too hot, I’m afraid. Here’s the link to my original post where I make it in the oven: https://theviewfromgreatisland.com/how-to-make-clotted-cream/

      Let me know if you have any questions.

  • Reply
    Elizabeth Leaver
    March 8, 2019 at 7:57 am

    How am I just learning you can make your own clotted cream?! And it’s so simple! Even better is that I have all the ingredients for scones in the cupboard, I’m going to have to try this!

    • Reply
      Sue
      March 8, 2019 at 8:00 am

      Oh Elizabeth, you have some good eating ahead of you my girl…

  • Reply
    Gina B
    March 8, 2019 at 7:46 am

    I’ve made your oven clotted cream countless times, and I got an instant pot for Christmas, so I am so excited to try this, I’ll report back, thanks Sue!!!!!

    • Reply
      Sue
      March 8, 2019 at 7:55 am

      I prefer this method Gina, the Instant Pot ‘pot’ is just the right size for the cream. And it’s so easy.

  • Reply
    Tricia | Saving Room for Dessert
    March 8, 2019 at 4:07 am

    Oh goodness, this looks too easy not to try! I can think of a million ways to use this clotted cream. Can’t wait for the scone recipe too! Pinned :)

    • Reply
      Sue
      March 8, 2019 at 8:02 am

      Actually I think I’ll do a post on that Tricia, on all the other ways you can use clotted cream :)

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